Knowing When to Walk Away in Domestic Disputes

Every Couple I know, has fought one way or another, over one thing or another whether it is over finances, infidelity, in-laws, drug and alcohol issues and beyond, people argue, it is part of being a human being. The question is when is it time to walk away? Some times one of the parties need to get up and leave for the short term or leave for good. Some situations can easily rise to the level of no return and that is the last thing anyone needs. If a situation is getting worse and you have expressed your desire to be left alone, to have the person stop contacting you, to stop harassing you or invading your personal space in your home, it may be wise to leave. It could be wise to take a picture of the person who is fighting with you and a picture of yourself especially if you have been hit or physically hurt in anyway. The goal is to be able to walk away before things get violent or arguments happen in front of the children, they do not need to see that.

Domestic Violence includes: harassment, assault, criminal mischief, sexual assault, stalking, terroristic threats, lewdness, criminal trespass, burglary, criminal sexual contact, false imprisonment, kidnapping, criminal restraint, and homicide.

You may be married, you may live together, you may be dating, you may have a child together, either way, when it appears that there is no turning back or you need to protect yourself and seek an attorney to help you through the family law or criminal courts, contact us on 201-706-7910.

Common Sense- Shared Parenting Does Not Work When Parents Live Far From Each Other

Some people will do anything to get back at their spouse, some people will do anything to pay little to no child support including an unrealistic shared parenting plan. Shared parenting is geared for people with young children and/or who live near each other. However, many people do not think how going from one house one day to another the house the next day and back and forth leads to further confusion and tension for the child. Children need stability and rules. When children are shuffled from one home to the next, who sets the rules? What is the homework or school project routine? How do they build friendships in their neighborhood if they are always running from one parent’s home to the next?

Recently we had a case where the mother lived in Jersey City and the father lived in Weehawken. The father refused to allow the kids who were getting older to live in one home consistently and even tried to register the children in his school district despite the mother being the primary custodial parent. When we argued in court, the Judge ruled in our favor that while the parents live in the same county, it can easily take one hour to get to and from Jersey City to Weehawken and that the distance was not conducive for the children’s well-bring for a shared parenting plan and that of course, the children should attend school close to the primary parent’s home.